Property

Movement at the Station: Recent property listings

Property editor Linda Rowley, 28/06/2023

THIS week’s property review includes this wrap-up of interesting recent listings across the country, and a separate article of recently relisted properties of note.

  • NT’s Dorisvale likely to make $35m
  • Lucky Dip into tightly held CQ cattle country
  • Clemesha family lists south-west Qld aggregation
  • Breeding & backgrounding at Barcaldine
  • Adjoining holdings in Slim Dusty cattle country return to the market

The 67,500ha Dorisvale Station is west of Pine Creek in the Claravale region, 350km south-west of Darwin.

NT’s Dorisvale likely to make $35m

Around $35 million is anticipated for a Top End cattle breeding property with dryland farming potential.

The 67,500ha Dorisvale Station, pictured above, is west of Pine Creek in the Claravale region, 350km south-west of Darwin.

Held by Tony and Julie Harrower for 45 years, the couple has decided to downsize but maintain Old Mount Bundey Station, south of Darwin, which they purchased in April 2016.

Dorisvale is currently running 12,000 head of cattle, including 6000 breeders.

A combination of deep red Kandasol and black soil flats provides farming potential. Currently, Dorisvale grows 200ha of jarra grass annually for fodder.

Situated in a high rainfall (1000mm) annual region, Dorisvale overlies Oolloo, Tindal and Jinduckin aquifers.

It is also abundantly watered by natural surface water, including the Bradshaw Creek, as well as numerous springs and creeks and the Daly River.

The Harrowers have significantly invested in expanding the watering points, installing solar bores, new fencing and laneways, and upgrading the main cattle yards.

There is also potential to lease neighbouring properties, adding a further 108,500ha to the breeding operation.

LAWD agents Danny Thomas and Olivia Thompson have been appointed to sell Dorisvale via an expressions of interest campaign closing August 9.

Lucky Dip into tightly held CQ cattle country

A desire to acquire renowned grazing and farming land in Central Queensland’s tightly held Moura and Bauhinia districts is driving inquiry for Lucky Dip.

The 2826ha block is fully developed and situated 54km west of Moura and 210km south-west of Gracemere – close to saleyards and two meatworks in Rockhampton.

Lucky Dip is a balance of gently undulating land types ranging from brigalow, belah, blackbutt country to areas of softwood scrub and heavier black soil, brigalow country suited to backgrounding cattle, cropping or fodder production.

Currently destocked, the property is growing an abundant body of buffel, rhodes and green panic grasses.

Lucky Dip has been held since 1962 by John and Sue and Robert Engwicht who drew the block in the Brigalow Development Scheme Ballot and are now offering it for sale to dissolve a family partnership.

Situated in a 625mm annual rainfall area, the property is watered by five dams, a bore, several small creeks and semi-permanent waterholes.

Since being cleared in the 1960s, all of Lucky Dip has been cultivated at some time.

At present, there are around 450ha of sorghum stubble and more than 100ha of cultivation ready for re-farming or sowing back to pastures.

Improvements include two homes, sheds, cattle yards and 600t of grain storage.

Matthew Noakes from PLPM (Progressive Livestock and Property Marketing) is handling the sale, being conducted via auction on August 4.

 

Clemesha family lists south-west Qld aggregation

After almost 100 years of ownership, the Clemesha family is selling its grazing aggregation in south-west Queensland.

Spanning 25,650ha and two properties, Weonia and Sunset Valley are located 20km west of Bollon, halfway between Cunnamulla and St George.

The country offers a mix of open buffel grass paddocks with strong stands of low mulga running around 2000 cows.

The Paterson watercourse provides seasonal waterholes and small areas of flooding in an area that receives 450mm of annual average rainfall.

The Mooroobikin artesian bore supplies water to Weonia via 45 troughs and 36 tanks, while the Charlton artesian bore supplies water to Sunset Valley via 41 troughs and 30 tanks.

Weonia and Sunset Valley will be auctioned on August 4. The sale is being handled by Nick Dundson and Andrew Wardle from Nutrien Harcourts GDL.

Spanning 25,650ha, Weonia and Sunset Valley are located 20km west of Bollon, halfway between Cunnamulla and St George.

 

Breeding & backgrounding at Barcaldine

Absentee landholders taking advantage of restocking are showing good interest in a central-west Queensland breeding and backgrounding property.

Kate McKeering, who is downsizing to Stirling, is offloading the 6546ha Moonya, 33km north-west of Barcaldine and halfway between Blackall and Longreach.

Peter Cooke from Nutrien Harcourts GDL is already fielding good inquiry from Charters Towers, Roma, Yaraka and Longreach districts.

“Moonya is an easy-to-run property that requires low inputs due to its natural doing ability,” he said.

The country is mostly open downs country with soft chocolate soils growing Mitchell, buffel, Flinders and button grasses.

Around 99 percent of Moonya is grassed with abundant feed, running 800 cattle.

It is well watered by a bore which services tanks and troughs (monitored via a Farmbot system), as well as three dams and seasonal creeks.

Improvements include a three-bedroom house, sheds and cattle yards.

Moonya will be auctioned on July 28.

Kate McKeering, who is downsizing, is offloading the 6546ha Moonya, 33km north-west of Barcaldine and halfway between Blackall and Longreach.

 

Adjoining holdings in Slim Dusty cattle country return to the market

Adjoining cattle holdings in Slim Dusty country in the mid north coast region of New South Wales have passed in at auction and are now listed for sale.

The 1789ha Pee Dee Creek and the 307ha Arrowdell are situated near Bellbrook, 60km north-west of Kempsey and 110km north-west of Port Macquarie in a 1167mm average annual rainfall area.

The neighbouring properties, aggregated over 20 years by Doug Thompson, offer water security and quality infrastructure including fencing and yards.

Michael Guest from Rural Property NSW said the Thompson family’s first purchase was in partnership with long-time friend Slim Dusty and his wife Joy.

“They purchased Slim’s original family property and birthplace Homewood and shortly after Arrowdell on the other side of Nulla Nulla Creek. After Slim’s passing the partnership was dissolved with Slim’s family retaining Homewood and Doug retaining Arrowdell.”

Pee Dee, which runs 500 cows and calves on improved and native pastures, has been listed for $8 million.

Arrowdell, which is run in conjunction with Pee Dee Creek, is situated on the Nulla Nulla Creek and is running 150 cows and calves. It has been listed for $2.9 million.

Mr Guest said Pee Dee Creek and Arrowdell offer productive, high rainfall cattle breeding country and first-class improvements.

 

 

 

 

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