Property

Movement at the Station: Recent property listings

Property editor Linda Rowley, 31/08/2022

THIS week’s property review includes this wrap-up of interesting recent listings across the country, and a separate article of recently completed sales of note.

  • Picturesque breeding & fattening in southern NSW
  • Quality grazing in SA expected to make $11.5m+
  • Wandoan ‘dress circle’ country on offer
  • Historic Condamine holding up for grabs
  • CQ block knee-high in feed
  • Development opportunities in northern NSW
  • NSW’s Booroomugga Station listed for $5.1m

The 907ha Bunnabukbuk near Adelong on the south-west slopes, is 20 minutes from Tumut and 30 minutes from Gundagai.

Picturesque breeding & fattening in southern NSW

There has been widespread inquiry from producers and city investors for a picturesque southern New South Wales breeding and fattening block suited to both cattle and sheep.

The 907ha Bunnabukbuk near Adelong on the south-west slopes, is 20 minutes from Tumut and 30 minutes from Gundagai.

It is being offered for sale by Tony and Bill Barton to enable succession planning and is anticipated to make between $13 million and $15 million.

The Barton family has been associated with Gundagai’s meat industry for almost 100 years, spanning three generations. Today, brothers, Tony and Bill, still operate Gundagai Meat Processors.

David Nolan from Webster Nolan offered a price guide of $14,333/ha to $16,538/ha for the high carrying capacity country.

Featuring versatile and productive country with yellow, red and grey box timber, Bunnabukbuk is predominately protected alluvial valley floor flats with the balance elevated and hill grazing country.

Located in a high rainfall region (around 800mm), the property is securely watered by dams, a reticulated livestock water system, Califat Creek as well as several other creeks.

Bunnabukbuk will be auctioned on October 11.

 

Quality grazing in SA expected to make $11.5m+

More than $11.5 million is anticipated for a well-balanced, well-improved and well-located grazing property in South Australia’s Limestone Coast region.

Described as a quality turnkey property in a sought-after area, the 668ha Chessington is situated near Spence, 25km from Naracoorte, in a reliable 600mm to 750mm rainfall area.

The country features warm rises and productive flats with well drained loam over clay. There are established shelter belts and a solid pasture base of phalaris and clover fed annually with 100kg/ha of single super.

Tom Pearce and Mark De Garis from TDC Livestock and Property said there had been widespread interest from locals and South Australian producers seeking expansion.

While the agents were unable to give a price guide for Chessington, recent sales and prices being quoted for properties currently on the market suggest around $17,300/ha.

For the past 10 years, the property has been held by the Treloar family who have invested in quality improvements.

Boasting high-capacity yards, most of the fencing has replaced and all the paddocks are serviced by a laneway system.

Chessington is rated to carry around 500 mixed cattle comprising 400 cows and calves plus replacements and 100 steers.

There is abundant underground water secured by an equipped bores supplying 50mm polylines via a brand-new variable speed submersible pump to poly tanks. This system is backed up by a second variable speed equipped bore.

Chessington will be auctioned bare on October 7.

Chessington is rated to carry around 500 mixed cattle comprising 400 cows and calves plus replacements and 100 steers.

Wandoan ‘dress circle’ country on offer

Quality scrub soil grazing in southern Queensland’s renowned Wandoan district is being offered for the first time in a generation by Laurie and Joan Jones who have decided to retire.

The 1952ha Kooroora is 28km northwest of Wandoan and 44km from Taroom – a region recognised as having some of the most productive and reliable fattening country in the state.

Darryl Langton from Nutrien Harcourts said the region is tightly held.

“The Taroom-Wandoan area is regarded as ‘dress circle’ country and over recent years, not many holdings have changed hands.”

Mr Langton said as a result, inquiry has been strong.

“Interest is coming from existing cattle producers seeking expansion – especially from southern Queensland and within the Brigalow Belt.”

Kooroora is looking exceptional following tremendous winter rainfall.

The gently undulating country features brigalow, bottletree, bauhinia, belah, coolibah and softwood scrub soils established to buffel.

Creek flats along the Juandah and Roche Creeks are growing a mix of buffel and native grasses, as well as scattered box and gum.

Around 80 percent of the property has been stick-raked and blade-ploughed, with areas previously contoured and farmed now returned to grass.

The Jones’ have been fattening around 750 bullocks on Kooroora which are then sold to processors. Today, the property is lightly stocked, after being progressively destocked in preparation for sale.

The property is watered by two shares in the Culgowie Community Bore Group, as well as 13 large earth dams.

Kooroora is being offered for sale by expressions of interest closing on October 14.

Around 80 percent of Kooroora has been stick-raked and blade-ploughed, with areas previously contoured and farmed now returned to grass.

 

Historic Condamine holding up for grabs

Condamine’s historic Moraby is being offered for sale by brothers David and Michael Rayner after 166 years of family ownership.

Moraby formed part of a much larger holding settled in 1856 by David and Martha Rayner. Over the years, parcels have been sold off, but the remaining 2688ha have been continuously held by family members.

Situated 45km west of Condamine and 75km south-west of Miles on southern Queensland’s western downs, Moraby offers productive grazing that can conservatively run 500 cows and calves.

The enterprise neighbours Teys’ Condamine feedlot and is close to major selling centres (Dalby and Roma), as well as grain handling facilities.

Owen Brockhurst from Nutrien Harcourts GDL Dalby said there has been good interest from locals, New South Wales and Queensland producers.

Featuring brigalow, belah and wilga country, with a small percentage of lighter loam and timbered country, Moraby has a good mix of improved pastures, buffel, native grasses and herbages in seasons. Previously, 220ha was cultivated.

The property is well-watered by an artesian bore, nine dams and seasonal flows in the Moraby and Dogwood Creeks.

Moraby will be auctioned on September 29.

Situated 45km west of Condamine and 75km south-west of Miles on southern Queensland’s western downs, Moraby offers productive grazing that can conservatively run 500 cows and calves.

 

CQ block knee-high in feed

Prime softwood scrub country carrying an exceptional body of feed in Central Queensland will be auctioned on September 30.

Emu Hills is an 820ha cattle grazing enterprise 22km from Biloela and 130km from Gladstone.

Owned by Ian Farmer who is downsizing, the block features quality undulating scrub country with native plum and bottle trees and areas of brigalow flats.

Joshua Heck from Nutrien Harcourts GDL Rockhampton said Emu Hills was ‘knee-high’ in developed grasses and pastures, such as buffel, green panic and rhodes, legumes and natives.

The property is watered by a solar equipped bore supplemented by dams that are scattered across the property.

Mr Heck said there has been good inquiry from across the state from producers seeking expansion.

Emu Hills is an 820ha cattle grazing enterprise 22km from Biloela and 130km from Gladstone.

 

Development opportunities in northern NSW

A versatile livestock breeding platform in northern New South Wales is being offered to the market with the opportunity for further development.

Centrally located 10km from Armidale, the 325ha Arding is a mixed farming and grazing property in the highly regarded and tightly held Northern Tablelands region.

Originally part of Saumarez Station, one of the earliest grazing blocks established in the New England, Arding features gently undulating to open grazing country with basalt soils.

For the past eight years, it has been held by a large local producer who is offloading to concentrate on his other assets.

Arding has a reticulated water system and extensive infrastructure, including a woolshed, sheep handling facilities, steel yards and an indoor sheep husbandry area.

The arable area has been conservatively managed by its current owner and offers substantial productivity upside with further pasture development and fertiliser application.

The holding also offers subdivision potential.

George Barton from McCulloch Agencies said there has been strong local interest in the well-known, sought-after parcel of land.

“Arding could be a stand-alone enterprise but is also a perfect bolt-on acquisition for a local seeking more grazing country due to the property’s good access, fencing and water.”

Previously, Arding was owned by the CSIRO Division of Agriculture, Food and Health Services for the purpose of scientific research.

It offers a full spectrum of working improvements together with a unique array of infrastructure, including laboratory and sampling sheds previously used by the CSIRO centre for its research pursuits.

Arding will be auctioned on September 29.

 

NSW’s Booroomugga Station listed for $5.1m

One of the oldest pastoral leases in New South Wales’ western division has returned to the market with a $5.1 million price tag.

The 16,458ha Booroomugga Station is situated 90km north-west of Nyngan and 50km west of Girilambone.

Earlier this month, it was passed in at auction at $4.55 million and was later placed under contract. However, that deal subsequently fell through.

For the past seven years Booroomugga has been owned and operated by Pat Lyons from Leeton who has now decided to concentrate on his other business interests.

Booroomugga boasts soft sweet heavy carrying country, Mulga Creek basin farming soils with slightly undulating to flat red loams and chocolate loams in the creeks.

After a wet winter, the property is looking lush and carrying a large body of native grasses and herbages, clovers, corkscrew crowfoot and copper burr.

Situated in a 380mm annual rainfall region, Booroomugga is watered by 24 earth dams and seasonal waterholes in the Mulga Creek system.

A feature of the historic holding is an original 1890s timber and pine seven-stand shearing shed, as well as yards that can handle 3000 sheep.

In the past, Booroomugga ran 350 breeding cows and sold between 800 and 1000 rangeland goats. Today, 98 percent is destocked, with the property carrying just 100 Dorper ewes.

David Russell from Nutrien Russell Property & Livestock said once fully developed, the carrying capacity on Booroomugga will be greatly increased.

The sale includes a 2143ha cultivation licence of which 525ha has been sown to wheat. A further 685ha has been pulled and mostly all raked.

 

Click here to access more properties listed for sale

 

 

 

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