Property

Movement at the Station – Properties recently listed for sale

Property editor Linda Rowley, 03/06/2020

Elrose, near Cloncurry, has fostered the rise of one of the nation’s pre-eminent northern Brahman seedstock and commercial operations.

THIS week’s property review includes this wrap-up of interesting recent listings across the country, and a separate article on recently completed sales of note.

  • Tightly held Cloncurry enterprise to sell after 100 years
  • Texans offer their NSW Heavin Farms Aggregation
  • NSW’s historic Digilah Station heads to auction
  • Crowther family exchanges two Qld breeder properties for Leeora
  • Affordable south west Qld breeding and backgrounding
  • New England grazing block surplus for owners
  • Retirement prompts the sale of two New England blocks
  • NSW coastal cattle breeding country

Tightly held Cloncurry enterprise to sell after 100 years

After more than a century of ownership, the Jefferis family will sell their well-known Elrose Station in northwest Queensland.

Located 64km south east of Cloncurry and 46km northwest of McKinlay, Elrose (pictured above) covers 29,035ha, with the main homestead block spanning 25,690ha and two lease blocks a further 3345ha. There is also access to 2834ha to 3238ha of useable stock route country.

The breeding and fattening enterprise has fostered the rise of one of the nation’s pre-eminent northern Brahman seedstock and commercial operations.

Current owners, Rodger and Lorena Jefferis, their cattle herd and operation are widely recognised as industry leaders in the northern Australian beef sector. Mr Jefferis is a former president of the Australian Brahman Breeders Association.

When they sell Elrose, the family will downsize to their block at Moura in Central Queensland.

Mr Jefferis said his grandfather drew the original Elrose block and successive generations have developed the property and its cattle herd into a well-known, highly productive enterprise.

“Through constant improvements in all sectors and continually embracing current technologies, husbandry techniques, pasture and seedstock improvements and selection, we are proud to offer this property,” he said.

Elrose boasts a mixture of open downs, creek and river frontage country and gently elevated red tableland country.

Natural water is a feature, with 25km of double frontage to the Fullarton River plus an extensive system of creeks and channels. The aggregation also supports a network of dams, bores and a number of seasonal waterholes.

Included in the sale are 2000 registered Grey Brahman females.

Troy Trevor from Queensland Rural said properties and cattle of this calibre rarely become available on the open market.

“The reputation of Elrose is second to none. It is a highly-productive unit that is well located in relation to the major arterial beef networks to northern Australia.”

An expressions of interest process for Elrose Station closes on June 30.

Texans offer their NSW Heavin Farms aggregation

Texans Diane and Gary Heavin have decided to divest their four Murrumbidgee River frontage properties at Jugiong, in south western New South Wales.

The co-founders of the fitness franchise company, Curves, started aggregating the adjoining properties ten years ago, while establishing their business in 92 countries around the world.

Developing a herd of cattle was a ‘natural’ for the Texans, but wool production was a novelty they embraced after investing in Australia.

Combined, the properties boast a 14km frontage to the Murrumbidgee River and 3682ha of productive and well-managed country.

The first holding, 1547ha Riverbend, is a highly productive breeding factory featuring 7.5km frontage to the Murrumbidgee River. The fodder production paddocks, open and undulating grazing, steeper hills and ridges are expected to sell for between $7 million and $8 million.

Riverbend adjoins the 1193ha Donna Valley, which enjoys a 2.2km frontage to the Murrumbidgee River. The undulating grazing country which runs into steeper hills and ridges is likely to sell for between $3.5 million and $4 million.

Donna Valley adjoins both Riverbend and the 654ha Tooracoll, which has $3.3-$3.8 million price expectations. The country consists of alluvial river soils running into open and undulating grazing country, steeper hills and ridges.

Tooracoll neighbours the 302ha Woolaway and Donna Valley, with a 3.3km frontage to the Murrumbidgee River. The undulating grazing blocks with areas of steeper hills and ridges are anticipated to make between $1.8m and $2.2m.

Woolaway adjoins Tooracoll and enjoys an 800m frontage to the Murrumbidgee River and has been described as the ideal farm and lifestyle retreat.

The Heavin Farms Aggregation will be auctioned as a whole or in parts by Webster and Nolan and Elders Gundagai on July 28.

Riverbend, is a highly productive breeding factory featuring 7km frontage to the Murrumbidgee River.

NSW’s historic Digilah Station heads to auction

Dunedoo’s Digilah Station is expected to sell for between $6.5 million and $7.5 million when it is auctioned on July 21.

The large-scale livestock enterprise, equally suited to cattle and sheep breeding and fattening, has been owned for the past 50 years by Bob and Fay Callow, who are now retiring.

The 1303ha block is situated 106km from Dubbo and comprise fertile and versatile soil types ideal for both grazing and farming.

The country ranges from light to medium loams and heavy alluvial chocolate soils along the creek flats. The hill country is predominantly red and black basalt soils, with the topography ranging from level to undulating.

In the past, Digilah has run around 500 Angus cows and calves and 1200 Merino ewes and lambs.

The Merrygoen Creek traverses the property with three permanent water holes. There are a number of large dams which are either new or have been extended.

David Nolan from Webster Nolan said there had been good interest from local and interstate producers.

Digilah Station was originally taken up by Robert Moore Richardson in 1854 for sheep grazing.

Ten years later it became the home station for the Patrick empire that stretched from Merrygoen, Leadville and beyond Dunedoo.

In 1914, the crown acquired most of the leased lands for closer settlement, reducing Digilah to its present size.

The woolshed is a masterpiece of early colonial architecture with its timber frame of huge round iron bark posts, and pine crossbeams, clad in vertical iron bark timber slabs.

Watch the promotional video for Digilah Station here. 

Dunedoo’s Digilah Station is expected to sell for between $6.5 million and $7.5 million when it is auctioned on July 21.

Crowther family exchanges two Qld breeder properties for Leeora

The Crowther family has listed its two breeder properties after paying around $17m (bare) for the adjoining Leeora Downs in Central Queensland’s Arcadia Valley.

In April, the Crowthers secured the 3560ha Leeora Downs cattle enterprise prior to auction for an undisclosed sum.

Sam and Heather Crowther, and their son Andrew and wife Katie, are based at the 3500ha Harrow that breeds, backgrounds and finishes cattle through their 650-head SCU accredited feedlot.

Prospect Park

Their first property being sold,  1558ha Prospect Park, is located 80km from Moura and 150km from Biloela, in the heart of blue-ribbon Bauhinia district.

Featuring brigalow, softwood, bottle tree and bonewood scrub country, it is well grassed with predominately buffel and green panic. The balance runs down to fertile creek flats that are well established with improved pastures.

Water is secured by two bores, three dams plus water holes in the Prospect Creek.

Prospect Park will be auctioned bare of stock and plant by Hourn & Bishop Qld on July 9.

Handling facilities on Prospect Park

Spring Grove

Meantime, the Crowther’s second holding, 2496ha Spring Grove, is located 7km north of Surat.

Featuring highly productive, fertile, mixed soil types, it is estimated to carry 1000 backgrounders.

The property has been fully developed and is heavily pastured with prolific buffel grass.

Water is a feature with a 6km double frontage to the Bungil Creek, two bores, tanks and troughs, dams and waterholes.

Spring Grove will be auctioned on July 2 by Darryl Langton from Nutrien Harcourts.

 

Affordable south west Qld breeding and backgrounding

Cunnyana is a south-west Queensland cattle breeding and backgrounding property that will suit producers seeking entry into the industry, or additional scale.

Located 125km south of Mitchell and 130km north of St George, the 12,300ha block is described as easy to manage, low cost country that can carry 1100 adult equivalents or 700 breeders and followers during average seasons.

It comprises soft red soils timbered with box, brigalow, sandalwood, pine, a small area of mulga and good levels of established buffel.

Cunnyana is watered by a new artesian share bore and 11 dams.

After 12 years of ownership, it is being sold by Greg and Robyn Bryant and their son Doug and his wife, Sue, to enable succession planning.

Ben Forrest from the Resolute Property Group said Cunnyana offered a younger family a good property in an affordable price range.

Expectations are around $494/ha ($6 million).

Cunnyana is for sale by expressions of interest with offers closing on June 18.

Watch the promotional video for Cunnyana here.

 

New England grazing block surplus for owners

Another property that represents an opportunity to step into the agricultural industry or add to an existing portfolio is Avenue Flat in northern New South Wales.

Located on the western side of the favoured New England region, the 805ha holding enjoys a high summer-dominant rainfall and the added benefit of a softer winter.

Avenue Flat has the versatility of a mixture of soil types ranging from fertile creek flats rising to basalt caps.

It can carry 4500 DSE with a mix of both cattle and sheep and currently has 80ha of winter wheat sown down and being grazed to finish lambs for the domestic trade.

Water is a feature, with double frontage to the Abington and Laura creeks, as well as 27 dams.

The Roma-based Wilson family, who have held Avenue Flat for around ten years, are looking to extend their interests locally in southern Queensland.

Avenue Flat will be offered for auction by Elders Tamworth on June 25.

Avenue Flat has the versatility of a mixture of soil types ranging from fertile creek flats rising to basalt caps.

 

Retirement prompts the sale of two New England blocks

Spring Ridge, in the reliable eastern fall country of New South Wales’ New England region, will be offered to the market for the first time in 131 years.

Located 57km from Armidale and 40km from Guyra, the 530ha holding was selected by the Finlayson family’s ancestors in 1889.

A standout is the water security, with significant access to the renowned Backwater and Johns creeks, substantial dams, and reticulation to troughs.

Spring Ridge features a balance of highly developed and arable areas suitable for cropping and intensive sheep and cattle grazing for 4000 dry sheep equivalents.

It is being sold by an expressions of interest process with Ray White Rural closing on July 1.

Spring Ridge features a balance of highly developed and arable areas suitable for cropping and intensive sheep and cattle grazing for 4000 dry sheep equivalents.

Meantime, RWR is offering the 456ha picturesque Oaklands block which has many elevated vantage points capturing incredible views over the adjoining New England natural gorge country.

Located 40km east of Armidale, the productive property features undulating to plateau type terrain with a mix of both basalt and granite soils.

Like the Finlaysons, vendor Clayton Waters is seeking to retire.

Oaklands is well presented and offering an abundance of grass following 500mm of rain. It is currently lightly stocked with cattle but can carry around 3700DSE.

The well-watered property with 12 dams and access to both the Four Mile and Becks creeks, is being auctioned on July 2.

Oaklands is well presented and offering an abundance of grass following 500mm of rain. It is currently lightly stocked with cattle but can carry around 3700 DSE.

 

NSW coastal cattle breeding country

Strike A Light on New South Wale’s mid north coast is expected to sell at auction for more than $4.5 million.

The 6186 hectares of coastal cattle breeding country has an abundant water supply with a 4.6km river frontage, 21.3km of creek frontage and 76 dams.

The property also comes with a 40ML irrigation dam and 50ML irrigation licence.

Strike A Light has undergone significant infrastructure improvement (sheds, yards and dams) over the past three years.

Adam Homewood from Ray White Rural said there had been strong inquiry, but the COVID restrictions were likely to hinder several interstate interests from participating.

Strike A Light on New South Wale’s mid north coast is expected to sell at auction for more than $4.5 million.

Click here to access more properties listed for sale.

 

 

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Comments

  1. graham johns, 04/06/2020

    i’m not sure that $6M for Cunnyana Station South of Mitchell puts it into the category of affordable backgrounding but I am certainly confident that $6M is not within reach of a young family looking to enter the industry. While the property definitely is an entry level property as its carrying capacity indicates it is an unreachable price tag for an individual to achieve without significant backing, the industry have priced properties so far out of reach that young families can’t enter the industry.

    • Brad, 16/10/2020

      $6 million dollars that’s way out of my reach
      Im a young bloke looking at buying a farm but what the banks want in a deposit there ain’t a hope in hell I’ll ever get my dream the prices are so high and there getting dearer
      Is there anyone with any ideas how I can achieve my dream
      Thanks

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