Property

Movement at the Station: Properties for sale

Property editor Linda Rowley, March 31, 2021

THIS week’s property review includes this wrap-up of interesting recent listings across the country, and a separate article of recently completed sales of note.

  • Strong inquiry for standout cattle country in Central Qld
  • Clarks sell Longreach’s historic Leander
  • NSW Upper Hunter grazing listed at $7.4m
  • $5m + for Flinders Ranges sheep station
  • New England scale and water returns to the market
  • Well-watered South Burnett property listed for $8m
  • Expansion with Mount Perry grazing
  • Local interest for NSW basalt soil block

 

Strong inquiry for standout cattle country in Central Qld

There has been plenty of inquiry for the quality breeding, backgrounding and finishing property Yantumara, in Central Queensland’s renowned Bauhinia District.

The 5211ha property is situated at Goomally, 25km from Bauhinia and 100km from Moura.

Yantumara consists of 4290ha of open grassland, 920ha of forest country under timber, with around 90ha established to leucaena.

The property is EU accredited and can run 1500 adult equivalents. It is presently lightly stocked in preparation for the April 27 auction.

Water is a standout feature with 9km of dual frontage to Repulse Creek, seasonal waterholes, six dams and two bores that deliver 156,000 litres of water to four tanks and 15 troughs.

Yantumara consists of 4290ha of open grassland, 920ha of forest country under timber, with around 90ha established to leucaena.

Meantime, Brett Nobbs’ highly regarded finishing and backgrounding property Newlands will go under the hammer on April 22.

Located at Gainsford, 27km south of Duaringa and 50km north of Baralaba, the 866ha holding features fully developed brigalow, belah, bottletree softwood scrub country, with a small area of elevated rosewood country.

The property has 2km of Dawson River frontage and is flood free. It is also watered by five dams.

Newlands boasts abundant feed and established improved pastures, including buffel, green panic and bambatsi panic that can run between 400 and 450 steers to bullocks.

Newlands will be sold bare of stock and plant.

Brad Hanson from Hourn & Bishop Qld said the standout properties are attracting interest from producers seeking expansion – from as far south to the Downs to the west, and from Emerald to the Central Highlands.

Newlands boasts abundant feed and established improved pastures, including buffel, green panic and bambatsi panic that can run between 400 and 450 steers to bullocks.

Clarks sell Longreach’s historic Leander

Peter and Elizabeth Clark are selling their historic Longreach property Leander after 113 years of single-family ownership.

Leander has been in the ownership of the Barrett/Clark families since 1908 and boasts a nine-bedroom homestead built in 1912 and established gardens nurtured over the generations.

The 12,218ha holding consists of 11,091ha freehold and 1127ha permit to occupy and is located 25km west of Longreach with direct frontage to the Landsborough Highway.

Leander, which is responding to recent rain, comprises a diverse mix of country. A third is high soft desert country, 30pc is developed pebbly gidgee which fronts the Darr River (with flood-out country along Strathdarr/Invercauld boundary), with the remaining third boree downs country interspersed with coolabah channels and some gidgee country with double frontage to the Dingo Creek.

Presenting as a low-cost operation with reliable water, good fencing and improvements, the clean wool growing country has traditionally run 6500 mixed sheep or cattle equivalents.

A feature is the fully paid-for wild dog barrier fence that significantly reduces grazing pressure and assists in the control of pests, increasing productivity.

Selling agent Wally Cooper from RPL said Leander was large enough to be a stand-alone enterprise or depot, and would suit like-minded sheep, cattle or goat producers, while also offering a local professional a rural base close to town.

While the market will dictate the price, district sales evidence indicates Leander will sell for in excess of $350/ha.

The property is being offered for sale by expressions of interest closing on April 29.

Peter and Elizabeth Clark are selling their historic Longreach property Leander after 113 years of single-family ownership.

NSW Upper Hunter grazing listed at $7.4m

Fernleigh, a 2074ha breeding or fattening sheep or cattle operation at Ellerston in New South Wales’ Upper Hunter, has been listed for sale for $7.4 million.

Michael Burke from MacCallum Inglis said Fernleigh has been extensively improved over the past 20 years, with sustainable farming development as a goal.

“The vendor has focused on productivity, profitability and sustainable land management by improving pastures, weed management, livestock handling efficiencies and farm infrastructure,” he said.

Undulating and hilly country is complimented by heavy plateaus with soils comprising predominantly chocolate basalt with some red loams.

The property is currently lightly stocked and enjoying an abundance of good quality stock feed.

Fernleigh has been rated to carry up to 9100 DSE per annum, and with further pasture development and fertiliser this number could be increased.

There are 46 dams and four equipped bores supply water to large header tanks and reticulate to 14 toughs.

Fernleigh, a 2074ha beef cattle and wool operation at Ellerston in New South Wales’ Upper Hunter, has been listed for sale with a price guide of between $7.4m and $8.2m.

$5m+ for Flinders Ranges sheep station

After four generations of ownership, the Slade family has decided to offload the historic Moolooloo Station in South Australia’s iconic Flinders Ranges.

Situated 500km north of Adelaide, the picturesque high yielding wool growing country boasts ranges and gorges with redgum lined creeks.

Settled in 1851 by John McKinley and his brother Dr McKinley, Moolooloo Station was originally called Oratunga.

Two years later, the run, which was ill-defined and extended far beyond its present boundaries, was sold to brothers James and John Chambers.

In 1854 they engaged South Australian surveyor general John McDouall Stuart, who went on to become one of Australia’s most accomplished inland explorers, to survey the property.

In 1857 copper was discovered south of the present Moolooloo homestead and James Chambers and his partner William Finke established the Oratunga and then the Nuccaleena mines which are now places of historical significance.

By 1902 the large property had been reduced to its present size – 60,900ha.

In 1962 it was purchased by descendants of the present owners, the Slade family, who arrived from England in the 1850s.

The country on Moolooloo encompasses healthy bush to winter clovers and native grasses and is rated to carry 10,250 sheep equivalents.

Water is distributed by 23 bores and wells, five permanent springs, numerous semi-permanent springs and five major creeks fed by a myriad of smaller creeks.

Philip Keen from Elders said Moolooloo Station presents an opportunity to create dual income streams from both livestock production and established tourism operations.

Last year, the Elders agents were working with a number of parties on a price guide of more than $5 million.

After four generations of ownership, the Slade family has decided to offload the historic Moolooloo Station in South Australia’s iconic Flinders Ranges.

New England scale & water returns to the market

Deepwater’s Echo Aggregation offering economy of scale and water security in New South Wales’ northern New England has returned to the market after failing to sell at auction.

The 5200ha holding, comprising seven properties, is located midway between Glen Innes and Tenterfield – close to major feedlots, saleyards and abattoirs.

The country lends itself to cattle breeding, wool growing or backgrounding. Prior to the drought, the vendors were running around 2000 cows.

Situated in a 965mm annual rainfall area, Echo’s water supply is virtually drought proof with around 12km of single and double frontage to the Deepwater River, numerous large stock dams, creeks and seasonal gullies.

Added security is offered via a 104ML water licence (WAL) which provides water through a modern centre pivot to fertile river flats. Previously used to grow silage for stock feed, the irrigation may be used for any number of cropping or horticultural applications.

Bruce Birch from Ray White Rural is believed to be negotiating with several interested parties.

Well-watered South Burnett property listed for $8m

There’s strong interstate interest for a mixed grazing and farming property in Queensland’s South Burnett.

The 1725ha Windera Station, 36km from Murgon and 74km from Kingaroy, has been listed for $8 million by the Rockemer family.

The grazing country is predominately blue gum and apple tree flats with gentle slopes rising to narrow leaf ironbark hills.

Cultivation is suited to lucerne, wheat, barley, soybeans and mung beans, sorghum for baling and forage crops.

The vendors have produced more than 7000 round bales of forage hay and 200 tonnes of grain per year.

Windera Station can run 400 cows and calves, or 1500 backgrounders when using the 300ha for cultivation.

Last year, the vendors used fodder grown on the property (forage sorghum and pasture grasses) as well as the grain to bulk feed the cattle.

A 600mgl lake on Windera is self-filling from the Windera Creek via a two-metre private weir and there are two irrigation licences (one for the weir and one to pump from the creek when running).

Water is also provided by four bores, five dams, two springs and numerous waterholes in the creeks.

The 1725ha Windera Station, 36km from Murgon and 74km from Kingaroy, has been listed for $8 million by the Rockemer family.

Expansion with Mount Perry grazing

After 50 years ownership, the Dingle family is selling its 504ha Mount Perry grazing property.

Alonse is situated 74km from Eidsvold and 108km from Bundaberg in the North Burnett region of south eastern Queensland.

It is currently running 170 breeders, however there is potential to improve the pasture and increase the property’s carrying capacity.

The undulating country has mostly narrow-leaf ironbark and improved pasture including Burnett bluegrass and wincassia.

Alonse, featuring two sets of yards and good fencing, is watered by eight spring-fed dams, two bores and a permanent creek.

It has been listed for sale for offers over $1.9 million.

The sale of Windera Station and Alonse are being handled by Danielle Meyer from Danielle Meyer Rural at Mundubbera.

Alonse is situated 74km from Eidsvold and 108km from Bundaberg in the North Burnett region of south eastern Queensland.

Local interest for NSW basalt soil block

A northern New South Wales sheep and cattle block is attracting strong local interest for expansion or a as a stand-alone enterprise.

The 920ha Taroona is located at Pindaroi, 40km from Inverell, and has been owned by Doug and Raylene Rodda for the past 42 years. The couple is now retiring.

Boasting mainly basalt soils with some trap and running 350 cows, 610ha of the red and black basalt are also suitable cultivation.

Taroona is securely watered by 15 dams.

Inverell-based Terry Pyne from C.L. Squires said it is a diverse cattle and sheep production property also suitable for farming.

 

Click here to access more properties listed for sale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HAVE YOUR SAY

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Your comment will not appear until it has been moderated.
Contributions that contravene our Comments Policy will not be published.

Comments

Get Property news headlines emailed to you -
FREE!