Property

Movement at the Station – Properties for sale

Property editor Linda Rowley, March 25, 2020

Located 90km south of Blackall in the highly regarded black soil downs belt of Western Queensland, 25,702ha beef and sheep property Listowel will suit producers looking for scale and quality country.

THIS week’s property review includes this wrap-up of interesting recent listings across the country, and a separate article of recently completed sales of note.

  • SLM lists Blackall’s Listowel Downs
  • Sought after Arcadia Valley country
  • Mary Valley trophy property to sell again
  • $20m for SA’s Maylands aggregation
  • Hard to come by grazing in SA’s far north
  • Fattening and breeding in southern NSW

SLM lists Blackall’s Listowel Downs

Fund manager Sustainable Land Management Australia is selling the renowned Blackall grazing property Listowel Downs, pictured above, which will be auctioned by Colliers International on May 1.

Located 90km south of Blackall in the highly regarded black soil downs belt of Western Queensland, the 25,702ha beef and sheep property will suit producers looking for scale and quality country.

Featuring clay soils and lightly shaded gidgee and boree timber, the country type is perfect for breeding and fattening on Mitchell and buffel grasses, as well as a variety of annual herbages currently in season.

Improvements are in good condition and include multiple dams plus tank and trough facilities, and good fencing.

Carrying an organic certificate of compliance, Listowel Downs can carry up to 4000 adult equivalents or 25,000 sheep.

Sought-after Arcadia Valley country

A cattle enterprise in one of the most sought-after regions for grass fed beef in Australia could achieve more than $17 million when it is auctioned by JLL on April 29.

Properties in the ‘dress circle’ Arcadia Valley rarely change hands. The most recent transaction, in August last year, was the 3909ha Billabalong Station, south of Rolleston, which smashed district records, selling for $19.3m bare or $4950/ha.

Given that the 3560ha Leeora Downs was purchased in 2014 for $6.2m, the current vendor could potentially triple his money based on those figures achieved in August last year, property watchers suggest.

Leeora Downs is situated within Central Queensland’s tick fee zone, 65km south of Rolleston and 160km north of Roma.

The property boasts highly fertile soils and quality pastures that consistently produce premium grass-fed bullocks and support a profitable cropping operation.

Water is provided by a reticulation system complemented by overland flow dams.

Leeora Downs is offered for sale on a bare basis, however the property can carry around 1500 adult equivalents.

JLL agribusiness directors Chris Holgar and Geoff Warriner are handling the sale and are expecting strong interest.

Leeora Downs is situated within Central Queensland’s tick fee zone, 65km south of Rolleston and boasts highly fertile soils and quality pastures that consistently produce premium grass-fed bullocks.

Mary Valley trophy property to sell again

Trophy cattle property Bollier Park, boasting some of the better quality grazing country in southern Queensland’s Noosa Hinterland, has been listed for sale by Elders.

The 789ha holding, regarded as the jewel in the crown in the Mary Valley, is also suited to horses, cropping and lifestyle.

The property is capable of running up to 2000 cattle on extensive areas of alluvial soils and heavier flood plain soils, with Mary River and creek frontage rising to warm gently sloping forest country.

Bollier Park features an abundance of water via the Mary River, with a 16ha irrigation licence, frontage to Coonoon Gibber Creek, plus bores and 33 troughs.

The high standard of structural improvements includes quality fencing – 4-barb and mostly steel gateways divided in 26 main paddocks.

Bollier Park has changed hands twice in 11 years.

In 2006, the Queensland Government proposed the $2 billion Traveston Crossing Dam near Gympie, designed to secure water for Brisbane during extended dry periods.

In 2009, the government paid $483m for 464 resumed properties, spanning 13,000 hectares, in the Mary Valley.

Bollier Park owners, the Gears were offered $25.3m – an offer too good to refuse – and subsequently rented their property back from the state government for $20 a week.

When the federal government refused to approve the project, the properties were divested resulting in a $250m shortfall.

In 2016, the Gears acquired their property for $8.6m, netting them a $16.7m profit in just seven years.

Selling agent Dick Allpass said there has already been strong interest in Bollier Park from producers in New South Wales, Queensland’s north and Central Highlands.

Bollier Park will be auctioned on a bare basis on May 7.

Trophy cattle property Bollier Park, boasting some of the better quality grazing country in southern Queensland’s Noosa Hinterland, has been listed for sale by Elders.

$20m sought for SA’s Maylands aggregation

The prized South Australian grazing and farming aggregation Maylands is looking to achieve upwards of $20m walk-in walk-out.

Located 90km from Adelaide on South Australia’s Fleurieu Peninsula, the 1500ha holding consists of three adjoining farms known as Callawonga, Maylands and Bramleys.

Prior to Christmas, it was being offered to the market by way of expressions of interest. However, strong interest and multiple offers failed to meet the vendor’s expectations and the aggregation is now available through Elders on a price on application basis.

Maylands is situated in a high rainfall area averaging 920mm per annum and features extensive water catchment rights.

It is presently utilised as a sheep breeding operation and is also suitable for cattle production, including high-value Wagyu breeding, or vineyard development.

Rural property specialist Adam Chilcott said the aggregation is attracting farming families from NSW and Queensland.

“There’s also interest from corporates, Victorians and producers from SA’s south east. This is one of the largest contiguous holdings in the Fleurieu Peninsula and would be suitable for anyone seeking to hedge their risk.”

Mr Chilcott said the property also offers an upside opportunity.

“Maylands is located 20 minutes from Victor Harbour – a lifestyle coastal location. Many allotments have been released to the market and this property offers development and/or land banking to the right investor.”

The prized South Australian grazing and farming aggregation Maylands is looking to achieve upwards of $20m walk-in walk-out.

Hard to come by grazing in SA’s far north

Hard to come by grazing country in South Australia’s far north is being offered to the market for the first time in 80 years.

The 1146sq km Bosworth Station, via Woomera, is situated on the undulating Arcoona Tableland that incorporates Andamooka Island on Lake Torrens, about 450km north west of Adelaide.

The sheep station / wool growing property has been owned by the family of retiring Max Greenfield since the 1940s.

Bruce Cameron from Elders said Bosworth Station is already attracting interest from small SA operators wishing to run breeding sheep.

“The bush grazing country is looking healthy after recent rain. While it wasn’t drought breaking, it was certainly welcome and has filled a few dams and resulted in some good ground cover.”

Bosworth has a prescribed stocking rate of 7000 sheep and will be auctioned on April 15.

Bosworth Station shearing shed

Fattening and breeding in southern NSW

The highly productive livestock enterprise Mooresprings, in the tightly held Bibbenluke region of the Snowy Monaro in southern NSW, will be offered to the market for the second time since settlement.

Mooresprings has been run as a finishing and breeding enterprise and can conservatively carry 300 breeders plus followers, as well as 2000 ewes plus followers – equivalent to 10,000 DSE in an average season.

Vendors, Leanne and Terry Moreling, have owned Mooresprings for 12 years. In 2017, they decided to discontinue their successful Poll Dorset stud to focus on a Poll Hereford and Hereford commercial cattle operation.

The 1107 hectares feature mostly highly fertile black and red basalts soils, which agronomists describe as magnificent.

Located in a temperate rainfall climate, Mooresprings has an average annual rainfall of 660mm.

As the name suggests the property features permanent water from the Mooresprings, Tea Tree and Stockdale creeks. Water is also available from the 5.5km Bombala River frontage and nine dams.

Henry Mackinnon from Colliers International said there has already been strong local interest for expansion.

“Inquiry is also likely from other regions given the current DSE values. While there haven’t been any sales in the region for quite some time, offers are anticipated north of $2000/ac,” he said.

Mooresprings will be auctioned on May 7 and should achieve more than $5.5m.

The highly productive livestock enterprise Mooresprings, in the tightly held Bibbenluke region of the Snowy Monaro in southern NSW, will be offered to the market for only the second time since settlement.

Click here to access more properties listed for sale.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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