Technology

Laser probe designed to assess meat quality attracts meat science interest

Beef Central, January 15, 2018

AUSTRALIAN research into the use of a hand-held laser probe to measure meat quality traits has featured in an international reference book for food scientists.

NSW DPI research scientist Stephanie Fowler has authored a chapter in an international meat science reference book about her work to assess meat quality using ramen spectroscopy

NSW Department of Primary Industries research scientist Stephanie Fowler was selected to author a chapter in the reference book, Advanced Technologies for Meat Processing about her ground-breaking work using Raman spectroscopy, which uses light to assess meat quality without damaging meat products.

Dr Fowler said the meat processing industry needed to be able to measure traits in real time on the production floor to ensure meat products met consumer demand.

“Raman spectroscopy is an ideal tool as it is non-invasive, non-destructive and can provide information in real-time,” Dr Fowler said.

“We measure meat quality traits in the laboratory using expensive and expansive equipment which destroys the product, and now the Raman probe gives processors a tool they can easily use without damaging valuable cuts,” she said.

“Ideally the tool can be used to identify premium cuts for which producers could expect premium prices and consumers can be assured that they are getting value for money.”

Her chapter in Advanced Technologies for Meat Processing outlines how research has applied the technology to assess the quality of beef, lamb and pork.

Current challenges and future uses of Raman spectroscopy are discussed to help drive ongoing research, which will improve and refine its use in the meat processing industry.

Nine new chapters, including the chapter by Dr Fowlerhave been published in the second edition of Advanced Technologies for Meat Processing.

The book brings together international specialists with expertise in meat processing from nanotechnology-based sensors to detect pathogens to the latest advances in reducing fat and salt content in processed meats, in a text book for meat scientists and technologists.

Dr Fowler is based at the NSW DPI’s Centre for Red Meat and Sheep Development at Cowra.

 

Source: NSW DPI

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