Property

Movement at the Station: Properties for sale

Property editor Linda Rowley, September 9, 2020

One of the best breeding and fattening properties in NSW’s renowned Cassilis Valley has been listed for $5.8 million. Located 20km east of Coolah, Quindallup has been held by members of the Duggan family for the past 32 years.

THIS week’s property review includes this wrap-up of interesting recent listings across the country, and a separate article of recently completed sales of note.

  • Quality cattle country up for grabs in central western NSW
  • Historic Mount Nombi tipped to fetch $8m
  • High-rainfall breeding platform on NSW’s Southern Tablelands
  • Dawson River’s Acacia heads to auction
  • Versatile Rosedale at Forbes boasts secure water

Quality cattle country up for grabs in central western NSW

One of the best breeding and fattening properties in New South Wales’ renowned Cassilis Valley has been listed for $5.8 million ($9814/ha).

Located 20km east of Coolah, Quindallup, pictured above, has been held by members of the Duggan family for the past 32 years.

Owners John and Sue Duggan are now seeking to downsize to a smaller property, closer to family, where they can continue to campdraft.

Mr Duggan said the 591 hectares of country boasted rich fertile river flats stretching gently along the Talbragar River.

“The heavy rich red and black basalt soils are typical of the renowned Liverpool Plains. It is highly productive fattening country, with good infrastructure, that lends itself to a stud.”

Quindallup is watered by a reticulation system from two bores, dams and the seasonal Talbragar River. It is estimated to comfortably carry 300 cows plus progeny.

Mr Duggan said the property had exceeded its average rainfall this year.

“Quindallup has received 27.5 inches of rain to date which means the country is looking magnificent and the dams are full,” he said.

Gavin Beard from Nutrien Harcourts Scone is handling the marketing and sale of Quindallup.

Historic Mount Nombi tipped to fetch $8m

Around $8 million is anticipated for the historic, high-rainfall, mixed farming platform Mount Nombi in north western New South Wales.

Located 22km south west of Mullaley and 60km south west of Gunnedah, the property is nestled on the western edge of the renowned Liverpool Plains – long regarded as one of New South Wales’ premier agricultural regions.

Mount Nombi is a cattle and sheep breeding and finishing enterprise. Around 38 percent (610ha) of the property is arable and suited to winter and summer dryland crop production. However there is considerable scope to further expand the arable area and establish improved pastures across the grazing area.

The 1589 hectares of country features fertile black basalt soils capable of running 400 self-replacing cows, with quality working improvements and a secure water supply.

Mount Nombi once formed part of Bando Station, which stretched from Mullaley to Tambar Springs. The holding was purchased by the Orr family who arrived on the Liverpool Plains from Ireland in the early 1860s. In the late 1800s, the Vivers family added the property to their extensive holdings and in 1904 constructed a grand weatherboard homestead south of Nombi Station for their son, calling the property Mount Nombi.

Col Medway from LAWD said it was a true mixed farming property, equally suited to livestock and cropping.

“It is versatile operation with enough scale to sustain a standalone enterprise or an ideal addition for an existing agricultural business seeking diversity of production and climate,” he said.

“There has been good interest from locals and producers seeking geographical diversity to spread their risk. It may even attract high-net worths from Sydney,” Mr Medway said.

Mount Nombi is being offered for sale by expression of interest closing on October 8.

Located 22km south west of Mullaley and 60km south west of Gunnedah, Mt Nombi is nestled on the western edge of the renowned Liverpool Plains – long regarded as one of New South Wales’ premier agricultural regions.

High-rainfall breeding platform on NSW’s Southern Tablelands

Meantime, LAWD has listed a high-rainfall breeding platform with a history of sheep and cattle production in New South Wales’ Southern Tablelands.

Top Yarraman is situated 14km north east of Bigga and spans 1273ha, with around half of the country considered arable for the direct drilling of improved pastures.

Top Yarraman once formed part of Yarraman owned by the late “Gundy” Webster, one of the biggest landholders in the Crookwell district.

Today it is owned by Dutchman Ben Van Dalfsen, who resides in Monaco but owns a considerable holding in the Forbes district.

While the mix between sheep and cattle has varied on Top Yarraman, on average it has carried 2500 Merino ewes and 130 cows.

The property features reliable water resources from the Yarraman, Blackmans and Smigging Hole Creeks, as well as a network of dams (18 of which were desilted in the 2019 drought).

Selling agent Col Medway is handling the expressions of interest campaign for Top Yarraman which closes on October 8.

He said there had been good interest from locals, as well as sheep producers from other tablelands regions seeking a breeding block.

Top Yarraman is expected to achieve around $6 million.

Top Yarraman is situated 14km north east of Bigga and spans 1273ha, with around half of the country considered arable for the direct drilling of improved pastures.

Dawson River’s Acacia heads to auction

Rob and Kate McGavin’s highly-developed irrigated cattle enterprise in Queensland’s tightly held Theodore region is expected to make around $7 million when it is auctioned next month.

Located on the banks of the Dawson River, 180km southwest of Rockhampton, the 1076ha Acacia represents a viable standalone operation or a logical addition to an established supply chain providing a tangible hedge against seasonal risks.

Grazing areas are underpinned by 220ha of irrigated leucaena, while irrigated farming areas have the ability to grow a range of summer and winter crops including forages, cereals and cotton.

Tom McLeish from TopX said during their six years of ownership, the McGavins had invested a significant amount of capital and transformed Acacia from a cotton and grain operation into an intensive cattle enterprise, combining both beef production and irrigated farming.

The backgrounding and finishing enterprise benefits from substantial water entitlements. They include a 2199ML high flow licence, 500ML medium security licence, 200ML overland flow entitlement and three registered, unregulated bores that have a potential pumping capacity of about 2263ML per annum.

Earlier this year, the McGavins purchased the 46,735ha Barcaldine Downs, Barcaldine – a large scale stud & commercial sheep property – one of the seven outstanding grazing properties previously owned by Clark & Tait.

The property, which failed to sell via an earlier expressions of interest campaign, will be auctioned on October 14 by JLL and TopX.

Located on the banks of the Dawson River, 180km southwest of Rockhampton, the 1076ha Acacia represents a viable standalone operation or a logical addition to an established supply chain providing a tangible hedge against seasonal risks.

Versatile Rosedale at Forbes boasts secure water

Locals are showing the strongest interest in a versatile grazing and cropping enterprise in central western New South Wales, which has been listed for $2.8 million ($2965/ha).

The 942ha Rosedale is located south of Warroo on the eastern edge of the Manna Range, 66km from Forbes in the Lachlan Valley, highly regarded for prime lamb production.

Owned by Orange-based Dr Paul Cradock, who is winding up his assets, the property is currently being operated as a dryland farming enterprise with primarily winter cropping rotation and select sheep grazing.

As a dedicated sheep enterprise, it is estimated to carry between 5000 to 5500 DSE.

The Euglo Water Scheme, which provides year-round water, underpins the property’s water supply and this is further bolstered by surface dams and the seasonal flowing Bogandillon Creek.

Sam Triggs and Richie Inglis from Inglis Rural Property are handling the sale of Rosedale.

The 942ha Rosedale is located south of Warroo on the eastern edge of the Manna Range, 66km from Forbes in the Lachlan Valley, highly regarded for prime lamb production.

 

Click here to access more properties listed for sale.

 

 

 

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