Markets

NVLX Wodonga 27 Oct 2015: Export cattle prices lift

Leann Dax, 28/10/2015

Numbers increased at NVLX Wodonga to just over 2,100 and bidding was described as having some ‘urgency’ fuelling another price lift of 14c/kg for heavy export cattle.

Trade prices continued to firm, fuelled by reducing supplies at all selling centres and increased feedlot competition on better finished stock. Medium trade weight heifers 400-500kg made from 256-310c to average 281c/kg. Prices across the better yielding higher end young steers remained unchanged selling from 290-319c/kg.

The best price recorded on the day was 328c/kg for heavy vealers with European vealers and their crosses making from 290-322c/kg.

Secondary steers along with trade steers needing more finish benefited from solid feedlot demand, which lifted prices 7c/kg. Medium weight steers 400-500kg averaged 298c, while the lighter weight lines made from 285c-312c/kg.

Restockers didn’t hold back for lighter weight steers, with prices increasing 18c/kg. Well-bred lines of Angus steers ranged from 280-315c to average $907

The heifer feeder market was boosted by stronger competition from processors aiding a price rise of 19c/kg. Heifers 330-400kg regularly sold from 255c-280c to average 270c/kg.

Heavy steer rates were quality driven, with the younger well finished pens commanding premium prices of up to 315c/kg. Heavy steers sold 5c dearer to average 295.5c/kg. Bullocks 600kg plus were in limited numbers and posted impressive gains of 13c to average 295.3c/kg.

At the cow market, less processor bidding at some pens did little to push down values, with the cow market generally selling 20-33c/kg dearer. Heavy cows made from 234-257c while leaner grades ranged from 215-242c/kg. Heavy bulls sold from 250-300c/kg.

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