Ex-Indo ambassador slams 2011 ban decision

17 Jun 2013

The Gillard Government’s 2011 decision to suspend live cattle exports to Indonesia should be seen as a ‘10 out of 10 as a case study in how not to deal with Indonesia’, a former Australian ambassador to Indonesia has told an international affairs audience in Melbourne.

In a distinguished public service career Bill Farmer AO served as secretary of three Australian Government departments and held multiple diplomatic postings, including positions as Australia’s Head of Mission in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, and as one of Australia’s representative to the United Nations.

In June 2011 in the wake of the controversial live export suspension he was also appointed by agriculture minister Joe Ludwig to lead an independent review of Australia’s live export trade, a review that has since led to the introduction of the Exporter Supply Chain Assurance system which now underpins welfare standards in Australia’s live export markets.

In an address to the Victorian branch of the Australian Institute of International Affairs last week, Mr Farmer said Australia had to take more notice of Indonesia.

He said the 2011 live beef export decision had seriously undermined the Australian-Indonesian relationship.

“In 2011, with the flimsiest fig leaf of consultation, our Government announced the suspension of the live cattle trades to Indonesia,” Mr Farmer said, as reported by ABC television.

"This ill-conceived decision adversely affected Australian trading interests and the livelihood of thousands of Australian families.

"It undermined Australia's claims to be a reliable food supplier for the huge Indonesian populace, it played into the hands of elements in Indonesia hostile to our commercial interests, and it caused political difficulties for the Indonesian government.

"I think 10 out of 10 as a case study in how not to deal with Indonesia."

 

 

4 comments

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  • Kerry - 24 Jun 2013
    Ms Love: every article fails to mention the facts because the facts tell a vastly different story to the one the livestock industry wants to believe. Much easier to blame others for poor management, failure to take action, failure to meet OIE Standards and the atrocities endured by animals.
  • valda purvis - 18 Jun 2013
    In hindsight the situation perhaps could have been handled with a bit more diplomacy-but the shocking footage shown was very upsetting to the Australian public-and rightly so, at no time have I ever heard that the Indonesian government have apologised to us for the horrific abuse our animals were made to endure nor have -you asked for one-they might be -offended -so am I -very and so should the cattle men and all involved in the live export -this culture will not change -you know that-our reputation has been tarnished as we are looked on by other nations as not caring how these much maligned poor animals are treated -conditions won't change for them -there's no respect -not even a prayer at their agonising death-shame on all concerned.
  • Sharon - 18 Jun 2013
    Industry knew off the systemic abuses in Indo long before the ban, but refused to act. Shocking treatment of animals in live export has been ongoing for 30 years, and industry have failed to act. Industry knew of Indo's plans for self sufficiency well before the ban, but failed to ensure breeding was reduced to match those future quota's. Eventually, by consistently failing to act, the ban was imposed. The only problem I see with the ban was that it wasn't permanent!! You choose a risky business model, that imposes horrific unnecessary suffering on animals that YOU KNOW goes against the values of Australians, and you deserve everything you get

 

 

 

Home 24 Apr 2014

Ex-Indo ambassador slams 2011 ban decision

17 Jun 2013

The Gillard Government’s 2011 decision to suspend live cattle exports to Indonesia should be seen as a ‘10 out of 10 as a case study in how not to deal with Indonesia’, a former Australian ambassador to Indonesia has told an international affairs audience in Melbourne.

In a distinguished public service career Bill Farmer AO served as secretary of three Australian Government departments and held multiple diplomatic postings, including positions as Australia’s Head of Mission in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, and as one of Australia’s representative to the United Nations.

In June 2011 in the wake of the controversial live export suspension he was also appointed by agriculture minister Joe Ludwig to lead an independent review of Australia’s live export trade, a review that has since led to the introduction of the Exporter Supply Chain Assurance system which now underpins welfare standards in Australia’s live export markets.

In an address to the Victorian branch of the Australian Institute of International Affairs last week, Mr Farmer said Australia had to take more notice of Indonesia.

He said the 2011 live beef export decision had seriously undermined the Australian-Indonesian relationship.

“In 2011, with the flimsiest fig leaf of consultation, our Government announced the suspension of the live cattle trades to Indonesia,” Mr Farmer said, as reported by ABC television.

"This ill-conceived decision adversely affected Australian trading interests and the livelihood of thousands of Australian families.

"It undermined Australia's claims to be a reliable food supplier for the huge Indonesian populace, it played into the hands of elements in Indonesia hostile to our commercial interests, and it caused political difficulties for the Indonesian government.

"I think 10 out of 10 as a case study in how not to deal with Indonesia."

 

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